i2 Citation Award (2010-2012)

The i2 award was for the most cited paper in an INSNA publication (Social Networks, Connections and Journal of Social Structure) over the preceding five years. The award was $1,000 with an additional $1,500 given to the authors attending the Sunbelt conference as a contribution towards their costs. The award was made annually for three years from 2010 to 2012. In determining which paper received the award attention was paid to Scopus, Google Scholar and Web of Science.

The 2012 winner was “Recent Developments in Exponential Random Graph (p*) Models for Social Networks,” by Garry Robins (University of Melbourne), Tom Snijders (University of Groningen), Peng Wang (University of Melbourne), Mark Handcock (University of Washington), and Pip Pattison (University of Melbourne) appearing in Social Networks 29(2): 192-215, 2007.

The 2011 winner was “An Introduction to Exponential Random Graph (p*) Models for Social Networks,” by Garry Robins (University of Melbourne), Pip Pattison (University of Melbourne), Yuval Kalish (University of Melbourne), and Dean Lusher (University of Melbourne) appearing in Social Networks 29(2): 173-191, 2007.

The 2010 winner was “A Measure of Betweenness Centrality Based on Random Walks,” by Mark E.J. Newman (University of Michigan) appearing in Social Networks 27(1): 39-54, 2005.

Microsoft Award (2008-2009)

In 2008 and 2009 Microsoft sponsored a paper award for research on the social network structures of software development. Microsoft contributed $10,000 to INSNA's general fund to sponsor this award. Software development was and still is a critical work practice of the information economy. New models of software development are emerging that show significant ability to deliver and maintain the complex social relations of software projects. To understand these emerging forms of production INSNA invited papers that focused on empirical studies of collaboration and collective development of software projects, including the development of open-source software. Related collective products like documentation, support, and design were also considered. Also welcomed were studies that highlight important group processes and practices associated with robust software.

The 2009 winner of the Microsoft Award was "Extended Assortitivity and the Structure in the Open Source Development Community," by Vijay Gurbaxani, Kiron Ravindran and Anjana Susarla.

The 2008 winner of the Microsoft Award was "Extended Assortivity and the Structure in the Open Source Development Community," by Joseph Cottam and Andrew Lumsdaine (Indiana University).

Connect with Us

Facebook Twitter

Our Mission

INSNA is the professional association for researchers interested in social network analysis. The association is a non-profit organization incorporated in the state of Delaware and founded in 1977.

Contact:

support@insna.org

+1 (304) 208-8001 Tel
+1 (304) 523-9701 Fax

c/o JulNet Solutions, LLC
      1404 1/2 Adams Avenue
      Huntington, WV 25704